You may not have tried it yet, but you’ve almost certainly heard about the Virtual Reality revolution that’s been storming its way through the technology industry in the past five years. Virtual Reality (or VR) systems such as the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive use sophisticated Head-mounted displays and tracking systems to immerse the player in a 360-degree interactive environment  which they can discover and engage with in a way that no other technology is capable of doing.

Combined with emerging accessories such as the Virtuix Omni – which aims to solve the problem of running into living room furniture – VR promises to be the most realistic gaming experience available.

Active Gaming and VR go hand-in-hand, with immersion an increasingly important factor in the demands of exergamers. There are certain challenges to overcome, first and foremost to keep players from experiencing dizziness and migraines whilst in-game, but  there are already VR exergames such a VirZOOM and Widerun available to consumers.

But the potential of VR goes beyond explicitly exercise-focused games. Simple ports of modern shooters, adventure games and Triple-A titles to VR transform your favourite games into experiences that often require a significant amount of body movement – effectively become exergames in their own right – and this addresses some of the hurdles that exergames face with exercise stigma, as we discussed previously.

One major problem with VR active gaming at the moment is the cost of the hardware. Whilst it will become more affordable in the future, an Oculus headset will run you over AU $1000 at this time, and that’s not counting the cost of the Gaming PC required to power it.

There is, however a cheaper alternative. If you own a compatible smartphone, you can purchase a Google Cardboard headset for as little as $15. It might not have the same capabilities as its more expensive competitors, but it’s more than capable of providing you with fun new ways to exercise in your living room.

– EC

Have you tried out VR active gaming? Share your experiences with us using #activategamers 

Like us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter

 

Sources:

Shaw, L., W¨unsche, B., Lutteroth, C., Marks, S. and Callies, R. (2016). Challenges in Virtual Reality Exergame Design. 1st ed. [ebook] Sydney: Australian Computer Society, pp.1-8. Available at: http://crpit.com/confpapers/CRPITV162Shaw.pdf [Accessed 19 Sep. 2016].

Advertisements

One thought on “How Virtual Reality will Revolutionise Active Gaming

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s